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Electric Shock (Causes, Treatment, After Effects)

Question:

Please share your experience with electric shock. Submit Your Comment

Comment from: Zapped , 35-44 Male (Patient) Published: April 24

Immersion tank... forgot to switch it off before resetting and zap. Oops... low voltage household electric shock. Felt like my arm had been fiercely pulled. I had some tingling and numbness right up to my face which subsided. Second day, my arm hurts. I have a headache but I have hay fever and fibromyalgia so could be that, or paranoia. Now I am just researching, as it doesn't seem worthy of wasting a doctor’s time with COVID happening. Not much on post mild shock symptoms!

Comment from: Jack, 25-34 Male (Patient) Published: October 14

I work for a dock company. While doing an inspection, there was a ground issue that left the cable anchor to shore attached to the positive lead. I fell and caught myself on it under my armpit and had an electric shock. I remember smelling something metallic and seeing a bright strobing light until I could get off of it.

Comment from: western plumber, 25-34 Male (Patient) Published: July 03

I was in a factory leaning on a machine which had a bad ground fault. Nothing happened until I reached out to pick up a wrench on the metal bench and the current went through me. I felt the electric shock travel up my right arm like an army of fire ants and time kind of stopped for a few seconds. Then I came back into the room and it had stopped.

Comment from: Dolly1, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: June 11

I got an electric shock when I turned off the motor of the pool. The reason was because, I got some diatomaceous earth on my hand when I put the thing back in the hole after cleaning out the debris. I wanted to wash the diatomaceous earth off my hand, so on my way to go turn off the motor switch, I crouched down and rinsed my hand in the water in the pool. I thought to myself that if my dad was watching, he would tell me to dry my hand first before I turned the switch of the motor, if there was a possibility that my hand being wet would give me an electric shock. This was a stupid thing for me to think, and I think it was because I am on some medication that makes me think slow and stops me from doing things that I think of doing, such as asking my dad if it would be dangerous to touch the switch when my hand is wet. Or alternately, I could have dried my hand on my skirt first because I did have the idea that it might be dangerous, however fleeting that idea was in my mind. But my dad said nothing, and I went into the shed and put my hand on the wheel that the switch is attached to, because I did not look first to see where the switch was and check where I should put my hand. When I felt the wheel, I realized that that wasn't the switch. As I was getting an electric shock, I screamed, and my sister, who heard me and came running, said the scream was worthy of an Agatha Christie mystery. Then, while I was screaming, I tried to turn the switch in the wrong direction. After that, I turned the switch in the right direction.

Comment from: She 64, 55-64 Female (Caregiver) Published: May 03

I was fixing a new belt on the washing machine. I made sure I unplugged it so I wouldn’t get a shock, so I plugged it back in and tested the washing machine, the belt came off, so once again I tried it, and again the same thing happened. So the third time there was a flash like when you are looking at the flames in a fire. I looked down to my right hand and it looked like I was seeing the inside of my hand. I put my hand up my top, and wrapped it up to stop the blood I had. I ran outside to my neighbor to phone the ambulance. My neighbor got her son to get my children out the house to go in hers. I was still outside with my neighbor when I looked down to my left arm, it started getting bigger, then smaller, and then bigger all over. The ambulance came got me inside, and next thing my heart stopped. They got me back they said I am lucky, and my baby.

Comment from: queen, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: January 29

I had electric shock on a bus in 2018. I am still in pain in my right hand and experience pain in my left hand, lesion, tingling, and weakness. I can't do house work and am trying to get compensation. The doctor is trying to cover it up.

Comment from: Optohelper, 65-74 Male (Patient) Published: July 09

It was a dark hot summer night, we were playing follow the leader, and I was the leader. I first picked up a stick and tapped a wire. I grabbed the power line with both hands, my tire sole sandals were in contact with the garage roof and the electric shock make me glow in the dark.

Comment from: Sara, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: January 09

I am a retired person but got a little part time job working at a small clothing store. They use small vacuum cleaners. These cleaners are for home use and not for use in a commercial environment. In addition, the major home company who owns the store chain regularly “refurbishes” or sends their broken vacuum cleaners out for “refurbishing” and then we have to continue using them and vacuum each day. The cord going into the vacuum turned bright orange red and caught on fire and my left hand burned.

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Comment from: Emilaayy, 19-24 Female (Patient) Published: April 26

Today I was at work and I went to turn the lights off and I got zapped trying to turn them off. I was thinking okay I touched the wrong thing so I went to try and turn them off again and I got an electric shock the second time. It scared me and I didn't touch it (no it wasn't a light switch like in a kitchen or room, it was a lever in a box on the wall). Anyway after I got home my lower abdomen hurt on my left side and my arm is tingly and hurts, I have a dark spot on my neck after a few minutes after it happened. I wonder if I should go get it checked out.

Comment from: raleighNC277, 35-44 Male (Patient) Published: November 27

While working on a new building last week I was incapacitated by an electric shock. I was bed ridden from noon last Wednesday until today at noon, Monday 16th, 120 consecutive hours. I was the unlucky recipient of an unexpected 277 volt charge that conducted down my left arm to the lap below from atop an 8 foot ladder, until it knocked me out. I tumbled down to the ground from a height of 12 feet through a dropped ceiling 9’ 8” below me and fiberglass ladder to shape my descent, albeit unconscious, all the way to the ground so far below. I awoke a few minutes after the paramedics arrived. I was shuttled to the hospital for x-rays, CAT scans, EKGs, MRIs, you name it. Really scary. I can remember the 277 high voltage wire ARC when it first grabbed me. I tried to disengage but it only pulled me tighter before I passed out. I’ve got a pretty gnarly scar on my hand where the voltage went in. It looked like chewed up Bazooka Joe for the first four days, and we’re pretty sure it exited beneath my elbow to the metal panel on the back of the light where there is a burnt mark indicated my elbow grounded the circuit, to finally pop the breaker seconds later. In addition all else I can see are some bruises on my lower back, and a pretty shaken core (soul).

Comment from: MHChilds, 55-64 Male (Patient) Published: May 03

Working on heater strips in a room, my left hand little finger came in contact with 277 volts. Where it made contact, my little finger, and where it left, my wrist, it left burn marks. It was a little stiff afterwards. It has been a few months and now the finger is becoming stiff, swollen and painful.

Comment from: BigEd, 55-64 Male (Patient) Published: January 12

I was hit with 480 volts in 1978. I couldn’t turn loose of it for about 8 seconds, it knocked me off my feet with the powerlines still in my hands. I stayed in hospital 3 and half months, lost my ring finger on left hand. Grounded myself by grabbing both lines. Now I suffer so much pain all over; this shock has destroyed my body.

Comment from: trevor moxon, 65-74 Male (Patient) Published: October 27

I was plugging into a cooker socket when I got the electric shock, it lasted about 10 to 15 seconds. I couldn’t let go and all I could see was bright yellow flashes. Then I was thrown clear. But I had great difficulty getting up from the floor there. The right side hip hurts me now and I have difficulty walking. But there has been a little improvement in the past 24 hours but I thought I was going to die.

Comment from: shannon, 35-44 Female (Patient) Published: September 29

I got an electric shock in my apartment swimming pool. The pool equipment was not connected to a GCFI (ground-fault circuit-interrupter) and after entering the pool, I dove forward. The feeling was excruciating like I was being slammed into a brick wall head first. It blew me back in the water, and pivoted me. Moving through the water was extremely difficult. It felt like the water was quicksand, slightly pulling me backwards. I pulled myself forward like I was dragging myself through chest deep sand. I couldn't lift my leg up in the water. I reached in the water with my hand and lifted my left foot onto the bottom step of the pool. I scraped my right elbow out over the pool side, got my arms propped under me and dragged my body out. I was immediately paralyzed. I had severe pain, like something had ripped apart all of my bones and tissue in my arms, hands, feet and legs. I called for help and a neighbor called 911. Half hour later I was able to walk with assistance and went to the emergency room. I have a herniated disk in my neck and nerve injuries in my arms and hands. The pain is most significant in my hands. I have regular neuropathy that has developed over the last 2 months. The incident occurred approximately 6 months ago. My memory and balance are off, my speech is affected, and ability to multitask is hindered.

Comment from: Shocked1, 25-34 Female (Patient) Published: April 13

I was shocked by a light switch while living in a bad apartment. I told the landlord and he ignored it. The house burnt down a few days later due to electrical problems. Because the landlord didn't report me as a client of his, I received no help getting back on my feet. The Red Cross could not do anything. It took me about 5 years. Well, I finally got a place of my own now! I just moved in a month or two ago, and I just got shocked again. By a standard household light switch. The apartments are in the same area, I wonder if they hired a really bad electrician. I don't know what to do, I hope I don't keel over soon because after the shock I have had a headache, anxiety, ringing ears, and my heart is racing. I wish there was more information online on what to do!

QUESTION

Emotional trauma is best described as a psychological response to a deeply distressing or life-threatening experience. See Answer
Comment from: st, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: April 07

I received a low-voltage shock on the job. The electrical event caused 3rd degree burns on 2 fingers 1 1/2 years ago. I have seen many doctors, tried Lyrica and Neurontin, but the drugs have not helped. I experience pain symptoms and heavy fatigue every day. I am looking for any dietary suggestions.

Comment from: FRANK.J.D.C., 75 or over Male (Patient) Published: February 22

On 13/02/17 at 4 PM heavy storm rain caused a rain catcher to clog up and this meant cleaning the strainer located in the patio area. The two plastic down pipes were gushing with water. Having cleaned the strainer I was replacing it. My wife heard the thunder and saw the instant flash, as for myself I heard no thunder but was overpowered with blue light in the form of a sticky gel trying to push it away; perhaps this was only the water. It took only a moment I assume. To me it was like trying to get away from something in a dream. I was still standing on the chair very wet and called out I am ok; so I thought. I made it to the kitchen bench. At that point I was aware I was not breathing and was making myself do so. Getting my breathing in order it was an hour before I could talk only saying, blue light. Why my wife didn't call for help we can’t work out. The next two hours my response to a question was limited to single words. At 6.30 pm I went to bed, my wife rang our son and his response was to call an ambulance. I was taken to the hospital. I was discharged from the hospital at 11 pm, all tests ok other than high blood pressure. They found no external marks other than that I looked like I had extreme sunburn, but they hadn’t looked at my back. I had black marks which turned into blisters over the week. May be I could use some help getting to work out my/our emotional things. After three days I could smile again and talk and then find myself gazing at my phone and avoiding people; this is not me as I was before.

Comment from: zap, 55-64 Male (Patient) Published: November 04

In 1972, I was a machinist on an aircraft carrier. At the time, I was working in an auxiliary machine room (generators and evaporators). My sister had recently sent me a technical pen for drawing. That day, I was on duty (cold iron), when I was cleaning the pen. As I screwed the pen-tip off. It dropped and went through the grating into the bilges. I grabbed a flashlight and went down looking for it. When I pulled out the grating, there were several inches of water in the bilges. As I was standing in the bilges to find the tip, I thought I saw it. As I reached down to grab it, I needed to balance myself. I put my right hand on what was supposed to have been an insulated electrical cable. I found out later it supplied power for an emergency fire pump. As my hand touched the cable, I was immediately frozen in place. I couldn't manage to pull my hand off. I'm not sure how long I was stuck to that cable. My best guess is 10-15 seconds. I was finally able to pull free. I couldn't get up for a few minutes after that because my body was having severe muscle spasms. A few minutes later, I got up and found myself disoriented. I finally made it up to the next deck. I went to sick bay and the doctor gave me two aspirin and told me to take a couple days off. Two days later, I went down to the electrical trunk above where I worked to tell the electricians what happened. They couldn't believe I was alive. One of them said that cable is carrying 2000 amps. The other one said “There are enough amps in that thing to kill an elephant!” So, of course I wonder what it did, if it didn’t kill me. I was depressed for a long time and had to have surgery on my spine (C6-7).

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