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Angina (Ischemic Chest Pain)

Question:

What exams diagnosed your angina? Submit Your Comment

Comment from: lonestar, 19-24 Male (Patient) Published: September 10

I have had issues with chest pain for almost 5 years now. It started during a time of high emotional stress for me. One day, after being up for 2 days straight I had heart palpitations and numbness in the extremities and went to the hospital. Every since then I have had random chest pains that sometimes run down my arm. I am 23 years old now and the pains still come. While in high school I experimented with cocaine and marijuana. I only tried cocaine sparingly though, over a period of 2-3 months. I maybe did it 10-15 times. I smoked marijuana pretty regularly for a semester or so in high school also, but do not believe it is related to that at all. I have always played sports, I am in a college ROTC program and run multiple times every week for long distances and do vigorous exercise. The pains are not necessarily triggered by exercise; they are random and always take me by surprise. I have had multiple EKG's done, done a stress test, blood work, and seen multiple doctors and have received no diagnosis whatsoever. I know something is wrong and I can't figure out what. I don't even know who to contact any more since my primary care physician has already seen me multiple times on this issue and has basically written me off as "ok", which I think is total B.S. Please, if you know any specialist that can help, or a website I'd appreciate it.

Comment from: suszec1, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: September 10

I went to the ER the other night, feeling this heaviness under my left breast and my heart was pounding and then it would come to almost a stop and then a thud this alarmed me. The ER found nothing wrong. I still have this feeling there and tightness in chest area, I am tired a lot. I cannot think clearly sometimes and I just don’t feel right. Seems like angina. I have been under so much stress for the last 2 years and I do everything I can to try and find time for myself. I also am unemployed, living with a 21 year old son who has Asperger, and does not work. It has been difficult to say the least. I thought maybe this is just the stress, but I am concerned because I do not have health care and I am too afraid to go to the clinic. I read about Angioprim. It is too expensive for me, but I would like to try this and to add to the problem with the heart. I am asthmatic.

Comment from: Helen, 35-44 Female (Patient) Published: October 12

I understand how difficult getting a diagnosis can be. Angina is stable, unstable or variant. Stable is predictable, comes on with exercise, emotional stress or after a heavy meal and is relieved with rest. Variant is a spasm of the artery and usually wakes you during the night. It is not always brought on by exercise. Unstable angina is unpredictable, and can come on at rest or during exertion. It is usually a warning of an impending heart attack and requires emergency treatment. I have had two episodes in the last 18 months with severe chest pain. The last episode lasted 8 weeks and still continues to a milder degree. I have had no diagnosis as yet, but I am still having tests. I have heavy mid chest pain/discomfort and severe dizziness and weakness as well as anxiety.

Comment from: pdsamy, (Caregiver) Published: October 12

The lesson and slide show was fantastic.

Comment from: healty heart in OK, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: February 26

I recently have been experiencing chest discomfort, nausea, elevated blood pressure, irregular heart rate, shoulder pain, arm pain. I have normal ekg, stress test and ct scan, so now I am home from the hospital and will have an EBT heartscan that is suppose to pickup any blockage as low as 30% whereas other tests will diagnosis blockage from 50% and above. Heart attack can occur with as little as 30% blockage. I hope this comment helps someone.

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